Technically this isn’t a lore blog because Nero doesn’t have ‘lore’ per say, but more of a discussion about the way they went about the story. I would like to start by saying that I absolutely LOVED Nero. I thought it was a great game and the story hit home with me more than I’d like to admit. Before we go any further, I’m going to be spoiling pivotal parts of the game.

**Spoiler Warning**

 

I found it super interesting that the first two chapters really focused on David. For those who haven’t played and don’t mind being spoiled, Daivd is a little boy with an incurable disease that will eventually kill him. The entire game is the journey of him and his parents as they go through the motions of trying to deal with this horrible hand they’ve been dealt.

The first two sections have two different story lines going on at once: The mom and dad trying to deal with the new that their son is going to die, and a story about a dying warrior named David. They obviously parallel each other, but that isn’t what I thought was weird. Chapter’s 3 and 4 are all about the mother, Silvia, and the husband Nero.

Upon realizing there is nothing she can do to save her son, Silvia is thrown into a deep depression. The entire level takes place in the mental hospital she stayed in. David isn’t mentioned much, except to remind you that he is the catalyst that caused this whole thing to happen.

Silvia’s story is what affected me the most in this game. At the end of Chapter 3 we learn that she has committed suicide because she would rather die then watch her child die. It’s stated in earlier chapters that David is the only thing making Silvia happy. She’s so terrified that her happiness will get taken away again that she isn’t even seeing David for what he is anymore; a child. She didn’t stop to think how her actions would affect Nero or David.

Suicide is a weird topic for me. I’ve struggled with depression my whole life and I understand how it feels to just want everything to end. I’ve gotten the proper help and am now healthy mentally, but this game put the situation into perspective for me. Out of the two left behind, Nero was much more affected than David. Now this could be because as an adult, he understands the repercussions of losing everyone you love at once. It could also be that David is the only one at piece with the fact that he is going to die. David tells Nero later on that when he’s gone, Nero must live for both him and Silvia.

It’s fascinating that they were able to capture the essence of a child’s mind so well. Kids don’t worry about the future the same way that adults do. This is usually because of how innocent they are.

In the end, I feel like this was a story of how to move on from grief and tragedy, not about a sick little boy as I originally thought.

I will forever love this game. I hope that you will also take the time to pick it up and experience the story for yourself. Thank you so much for reading!

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